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Washington Divorce: What You Need to Know About Relocating with Children and Providing Notice to the Other Parent

The Washington State legislature defines a “Parenting Plan” as “a plan for parenting the child, including allocation of parenting functions, which plan is incorporated in any final decree or decree of modification in an action for dissolution of marriage or domestic partnership, declaration of invalidity, or legal separation.”[1]  Setting forth various procedures and responsibilities the

HOAs and Special Assessments: What to Know

If you have considered living in or currently live in a community with a homeowners’ association (commonly referred to as an HOA) such as a condominium or complex of townhomes, you have likely heard of special assessments. Generally, special assessments are what an HOA charges over and above regular periodic assessments that cover the routine

Commercial Tenant Evictions and What You Need to Know in Seattle

Mayor Bruce Harrell officially ended the City of Seattle Civil Emergency Proclamation on October 31, 2022, which affects the requirement for landlords to negotiate payment plans with commercial tenants that qualify as a small businesses or nonprofit organization. Despite the end of the eviction moratorium and the lifting of  the COVID-19 Emergency Orders, commercial landlords

Employment Law ALERT – New Job Posting Requirements Begin January 1, 2023

Beginning on January 1,2023,  all employers, with 15 or more employees (including employees in other states), engaging in any business, industry, profession, or activity in Washington (including recruiting for Washington-based employees) must disclose (i) a wage scale or salary range and (ii) a general description of benefits and other compensation on job postings that recruit

What to Know if You’re Getting Divorced and Your Spouse Holds Power of Attorney

Worried about a financial power grab in divorce?   A power of attorney can be like writing a blank check to your spouse.  Many married couples will sign powers of attorney as part of their estate planning documents, which provide broad authority to act on the other spouse’s behalf.  Estranged spouses have used powers of attorney

Community or Separate Property? Beware of THE Mortgage Rule

What you don’t know about your mortgage could hurt you. In Washington State, we are not a “title state.” Accordingly, placing your spouse’s name on the title of a separate real estate does not automatically make it community property. However, beware; if your spouse signs off on the mortgage liability associated with your separate property