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Washington Divorce: What You Need to Know About Relocating with Children and Providing Notice to the Other Parent

The Washington State legislature defines a “Parenting Plan” as “a plan for parenting the child, including allocation of parenting functions, which plan is incorporated in any final decree or decree of modification in an action for dissolution of marriage or domestic partnership, declaration of invalidity, or legal separation.”[1]  Setting forth various procedures and responsibilities the

If the U.S. Supreme Court’s Overturning of Roe v. Wade has Caused You Feelings of Anxiety, it Might be a Good Time to Take a Pause . . .

With Roe v. Wade overruled, people are aptly concerned that the constitutionality of same-sex marriage may be in jeopardy.  That fear is exacerbated by Justice Thomas’ concurrence in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, insisting that the Supreme Court’s rationale for overruling Roe be applied to Obergefell v. Hodges’ conclusion that the Due Process Clause

Can I Appeal a Ruling on a Family Law Case in Washington?

If a family law case proceeded to trial or ended in any way other than a settlement, then chances are one (or both) of the parties is unhappy with the result.  Perhaps one party feels like an important aspect of his or her case did not go their way; or perhaps the other party believes

In re Dewitt: An Example of Washington’s “Committed Intimate Relationship” Doctrine Applied to a Very Fact-Intensive Case

In a prior blogpost, I discussed Washington State’s Committed Intimate Relationship Doctrine (“CIR”) and outlined the five non-exclusive factors courts consider in determining whether a CIR existed: (1) continuity of cohabitation, (2) duration of relationship, (3) purpose of the relationship, (4) pooling of resources, and (5) intent of the parties. These factors (known as the

Not Married, Not a Problem: Washington State’s “Committed Intimate Relationship” Doctrine Provides a Means for Some Unmarried Couples to Have Their Property Divided Just Like in a Regular Divorce

In a divorce, the judge will have to divide your marital property and debts between the spouses.  The division must be “just and equitable” under the circumstances of the relationship.  But can an unmarried couples receive a just and equitable division of property after breaking up?  Under the right circumstances, the answer in Washington is